Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Drownings are the 2nd leading cause of death, nationwide, in 14 year olds and younger. The rate for drowning in open water at age 15 triples. Teens are often unaware of risky behavior and often have no fear.

Open water safety tips

Have a safety plan in place

  • Whether it’s your boat and/or lake house or a friends, make sure there is a safety plan in place before your child gets anywhere near the water. We recommend a “toe in/vest on” policy, in or out of the boat. If a toe is in the water, a life jacket goes on.

Know the water conditions

  • Water conditions in lakes and oceans can vary on a daily basis. From clear to murky and calm to rough waters, it’s important to know the condition of the water before getting in.

Wear life vests with U.S. Coast Guard-approved labels.

  • The single most important thing when it comes to open water safety is a life vest. Especially in murky water with a current, it can be the difference between life and death. If the lifejacket doesn’t say “US Coast Guard Approved” or “USCG approved,” you can assume it’s not safe. Always check the label.
  • Most drowning fatalities in natural water are non-boating related. While it is Important to wear a life jacket in the boat, wearing one in the water is even more important.

Insist on adult, non-distracted Water Watchers.

  • Children drown silently, so designate a Water Watcher to watch children and teens, if possible, in and around all water.
  • A Water Watcher tag can be used to designate responsible adults to watch the water when you have a party at the pool, lake or beach.
  • Send an email to safekids@cookchildrens.org  to request your Water Watcher tag.

Take family CPR lessons.

  • Learning CPR can be the difference between life and death while waiting for emergency personnel to arrive
  • Check your local Red Cross and YMCA for classes.

Schedule water safety and swim lessons.

  • Drownings and near drownings are 8 times more likely to happen to children that don’t know how to swim or are being supervised by adults that don’t know how to swim.
  • Learning how to swim and practicing proper water safety techniques are crucial but children that know how to swim are still at risk.
  • Need help finding swim lessons? Contact your local YMCA, Red Cross, or parks and recreation center for information in your area.

Help us promote open water safety

We’ve put together the below social media kit for easy sharing among your friends and family. It takes a village and together, we can help prevent another child from drowning.

Please feel free to use our messaging or create your own. To use our messaging, all you have to do is copy the messages we’ve provided below and insert the appropriate photo into whichever social media site you prefer to use. We do ask that you keep #LifeguardYourChild in the message.

Toe in, vest on

Whether it’s on your boat and/or lake house or a friends, make sure there is a safety plan in place before your child gets anywhere near the water. #lifeguardyourchild

Life vest safety

Most fatal drownings in natural water are non-boating related. While it’s important to wear a life vest in the boat, wearing one in and around the water is even more important. #lifeguardyourchild

Open water drownings

From clear to murky and calm to rough, it’s important to know the condition of the water before getting in. #lifeguardyourchild

Open water drownings

Open water drowning rates triple for teens when they turn 15, as they are more likely to take risks. #lifeguardyourchild

Get involved and help us save lives

Want to know how you can get involved or create an awareness campaign in your community? Contact Dana Walraven, Safe Kids Tarrant County coordinator.

682-885-1619 safe.kids@cookchildrens.org